Pressurized Water Reactor

Submarines
Submarines
Submarines Word Count: 7498 The History of Submarines In the year 2000, the American submarine force will celebrate the first century of service by highly skilled people in some of the most technologically advanced vessels ever built. The past 100 years have witnessed the evolution of a force that mastered submersible warfare, introduced nuclear propulsion to create the true submarine, and for decades patrolled the deep ocean front line; the hottest part of an otherwise Cold War. Submarines in
Nuclear Energy
Nuclear Energy
Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy During the twentieth century scientists have discovered how to unleash the most powerful energy of all; Nuclear energy. The study of nuclear energy began for the same reasons that most scientific studies are begun; to understand more about the universe and the laws by which the universe works. The more knowledge we have about the universe, the more we can control the world in which we live. Nuclear energy is contained in the center, or nucleus of an atom. This ener
Nuclear Power
Nuclear Power
Nuclear Power Nuclear Power Producing energy from a nuclear power plant is very complicated. The process of nuclear energy involves the fission of atoms, the release of energy from fission as heat, and the transfer of heat to electricity in power plants. The process of splitting the atom is called nuclear fission. Fission can take place in many different kinds of atoms. This explanation uses Uranium - 235, the atom most commonly used in nuclear reactors. The Uranium atom has many protons, thus
The Negative Effects of Nuclear Energy
The Negative Effects of Nuclear Energy
The Negative Effects of Nuclear Energy Word Count: 1852 In 1950, the first commercial nuclear power plants were constructed. The public was promised a non-polluting and resourceful type of energy, but how safe was, and is, nuclear energy? Although there are less than 500 licensed nuclear power plants in the world, many nuclear accidents have already been endangering civilian lives. More serious accidents are not just likely, but inevitable (Fairchild 29). Nuclear energy may appear to be the ide